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Ideology and Extremism

The majority of contemporary research on terrorism and extremism has focused on jihadi extremism, while other ideologies have received far less attention. In response to this gap, the current study aims to compare the similarities and differences between jihadi, right-wing and left-wing extremists at the individual level. Using the Profiles of Individual Radicalization in the United States (PIRUS) dataset, a multinomial logistic regression model was used to compare individual-level characteristics across ideologies. Additionally, a two-step cluster analysis was conducted to determine whether these similarities and differences can provide additional insights into differentiating types of extremists generally based on their personal characteristics, regardless of their ideological adherence. The results of the multinomial logistic regression illustrate that there are notable differences across extremist ideologies, but also many similarities. Further exploring ways to better highlight individual-level differences, a cluster analysis revealed five distinct groups of extremists based on their personal characteristics, and demonstrate the utility of a typology of individual characteristics that is empirically derived and validated, and is not dependent on the a priori identification or specification of ideological motivation.

This is the abstract of a new Studies in Conflict and Terrorism article by Sara Doering, Garth Davies, and Raymond Corrado. The use of multinomial logistic regression as a data analysis methodology in this paper is interesting. START’s Profiles of Individual Radicalization in the United States dataset is used in the study.

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Wednesday Links

  1. Ignoring the need economy (Slate).
  2. The end of open plan everything (The Atlantic).
  3. How the Simulmatics Corporation invented the future (The New Yorker).
  4. Even Milton Friedman would oppose Trump’s latest Federal Reserve appointment (The New Republic).
  5. When and how will the Putin era end? (RAND Corporation).
  6. COVID-19 reshapes the future (CSIS).
  7. A foreign policy election? (Council on Foreign Relations).
  8. The subtle art of ‘hacking’ UFOs (VICE).
  9. How the Trumps helped a COVID-19 proposal go viral (Vox).
  10. Call Trump’s tactics what they are: fascist (The Nation).
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Monday Links

  1. The declining power of the American passport (The Atlantic).
  2. Homeland Security was destined to become a secret police force (The New Yorker).
  3. Can Trump win in November by reviving Willie Horton? (The Nation).
  4. Maureen Dowd interviews Elon Musk (New York Times).
  5. How do you shop for books in a bookstore? (Marginal Revolution).
  6. Mike Pompeo just declared America’s new China policy: regime change (National Interest).
  7. The sly psychology behind magicians’ card tricks (Wired).
  8. Why 2020 is not just another 2016 (New York Magazine).
  9. Money and might (War on the Rocks).
  10. China’s grand strategy (RAND Corporation).

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What I’m Reading

  1. Why I Am Not Liberal by Jonathan Bowden (Perth, Australia: Imperium Press, 2020). A transcribed three hour interview from 2009 with the former far right writer, activist and Odinist neopagan, who foreshadowed many of the Alt-Right strategies in 2016.
  2. Marx In Motion: A New Materialist Marx by Thomas Nail (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020). A re-evaluation of Karl Marx drawing on his overlooked PhD dissertation. The book’s introduction clearly explains the different currents of Marxist thought and the post-2008 revival of his metapolitics.
  3. Human Terrain Systems and the Moral Prosecution of Warfare by Dan G. Cox (Didactic Press, 2015). My PhD briefly touched on the HTS debate and the controversial use of military anthropology in Iraq. I’m reading up more on the HTS – this defence situates it in terms of Just War theory.
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Research Program

Wednesday Links

  1. The false promise of anti-racism books (The Atlantic).
  2. Trump has brought America’s dirty wars home (The New Republic).
  3. How a star professor built a distance-learning empire (The New Yorker).
  4. Trump’s COVID performance is sinking his Presidency (National Review).
  5. The new age of autocrats (New Statesman).
  6. Beyond the Open Skies Treaty (Duck of Minerva).
  7. We need dystopian fiction more than ever (Slate).
  8. How will COVID be remembered? (Wired).
  9. Deadly terrorist threats (RAND Corporation).
  10. Alarm signals of our authoritarian age (Financial Times).
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Tuesday Links

  1. Economic competition in the 21st century (RAND Corporation).
  2. The only person who’s figured out how to interview Trump (The New Republic).
  3. The stranded babies of the pandemic (The New Yorker).
  4. The dangerous world of COVID conspiracy theories (Slate).
  5. How NASA launched a revolution in biology (The Atlantic).
  6. The race for a COVID-19 vaccine (New Statesman).
  7. China’s tech ambitions and the internet (American Enterprise Institute).
  8. Does Warren still have a shot at V.P.? (Vanity Fair).
  9. Buying your local newspaper out of a chain (Poynter).
  10. America needs another bailout (New York Magazine).
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Monday Links

  1. John Lewis was an American founder (The Atlantic).
  2. The forever war over war literature (The New Republic).
  3. What is distance learning for? (The New Yorker).
  4. How the second wave broke (The Saturday Paper).
  5. Sir Martin Franklin of Mariposa Capital speaks (Ritholtz).
  6. Distortions in the fabric of deterrence (War on the Rocks).
  7. US society is on hold (New Statesman).
  8. With fear and favour (The Nation).
  9. Could war with Iran be an October surprise? (New York Magazine).
  10. Why the UK banned Huawei (Council on Foreign Relations).
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Friday Links

  1. A second coronavirus death surge is coming (The Atlantic).
  2. Disney, Apple are pawns of China says US Attorney-General (Bloomberg).
  3. Nuclear tests have changed but they never really stopped (Wired).
  4. Trump’s losing; will Republicans abandon him? (The New Yorker).
  5. Could movie theaters stay shut until 2021? (Vanity Fair).
  6. COVID, economy, politics (Ritholtz).
  7. The big hack keeps getting stranger and stranger (Slate).
  8. Cities are becoming climate death traps (The New Republic).
  9. The effect of students loans on college persistence (National Bureau of Economic Research).
  10. Lies through which we tell the truth (War on the Rocks).
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Thursday Links

  1. Russia’s trolls and Campaign 2020 (RAND Corporation).
  2. The 1968 Washington civil disturbance (American Enterprise Institute).
  3. America should prepare for a double pandemic (The Atlantic).
  4. How food media created monsters in the kitchen (The New Republic).
  5. How much is a college campus worth? (Bloomberg).
  6. The Palace Letters solve a 45-year-old Australian mystery (Slate).
  7. Llamas and fighting COVID-19 (Wired).
  8. Racial justice is everyone’s work (Tricycle).
  9. How Pompeo’s focus on religion could recast US rights policy (Christian Science Monitor).
  10. Philippe Sands on the Uighurs (New Statesman).
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Research Program

Wednesday Links

  1. The United States needs a new foreign policy (The Atlantic).
  2. How to plan a space mission (The New Yorker).
  3. It’s time to tell a new story about coronavirus (The Nation).
  4. QAnon’s dark obsessions are merging with mainstream conservatism (The New Republic).
  5. How Sweden screwed up (Slate).
  6. The impact of Victoria’s second wave (The Saturday Paper).
  7. Poker and the psychology of uncertainty (Wired).
  8. The virus in the digital domain (Duck of Minerva).
  9. Why did the New York Times seek to silence Bari Weiss? (National Interest).
  10. End of the golden decade (New Statesman).