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Research Program

Friday Links

  1. Why populism can survive the pandemic (Carnegie Endowment for International Peace).
  2. This is what happens when ‘society has to function’ (The Atlantic Monthly).
  3. The fall and rise of Kamala Harris (The New Yorker).
  4. Fear of a Black uprising (The New Republic).
  5. She helped wreck the news business. Here’s her plan to fix it (Wired).
  6. Tik Tok ya don’t stop (War on the Rocks).
  7. U.S. approaches to leadership vary among services (RAND Corporation).
  8. Everything you need to know about Russia’s coronavirus vaccine claims (New Scientist).
  9. The coronavirus won’t be our last pandemic (Slate).
  10. Historic peace deal reached between Israel and UAE (New Statesman).
Categories
Research Program

Thursday Links

  1. Kamala Harris gives new meaning to the Biden campaign (The New Yorker).
  2. How the pandemic revealed Britain’s national illness (The Atlantic).
  3. If Donald Trump can’t make history, he’ll steal it instead (The New Republic).
  4. It’s not the military’s job to remove Trump from office if he won’t leave (Slate).
  5. The furious hunt for the MAGA bomber (Wired).
  6. Delivery wars (Rest of the World).
  7. The Vice President and foreign policy (Council on Foreign Relations).
  8. Elevating women peacebuilders amidst COVID-19 (CSIS).
  9. Progress and challenges implementing the national defence strategy (Hudson Institute).
  10. Economic diplomacy: a call to syringes, not arms (Lowy Interpreter).
Categories
Research Program

Tuesday Links

  1. How China controlled the coronavirus (The New Yorker).
  2. Tom DeLonge’s warped UFO tour (The New Republic).
  3. The ‘blue shift’ will decide the election (The Atlantic Monthly).
  4. Is Trump sabotaging the Postal Service? (Slate).
  5. Jimmy Lai’s Next Digital soars 344% after arrest, police raid (Bloomberg).
  6. Belarus shuts down internet amid controversial election (Wired).
  7. Merkelism will live on (New Statesman).
  8. Gearing up for economic statecraft (War on the Rocks).
  9. The U.S. crackdown on Huawei and Chinese tech (Council on Foreign Relations).
  10. Polis and the political process (Demos).
Categories
Research Program

Monday Links

  1. Where the pandemic is only getting worse (The Atlantic).
  2. Progressives are rallying behind Karen Bass for VP (The Nation).
  3. The deadly coronavirus vaccine goldrush (The New Republic).
  4. In memoria: General Brent Snowcroft (CSIS).
  5. The pandemic is a disaster for artists (RAND Corporation)
  6. The addictive joy of watching someone listen to Phil Collins (The New Yorker).
  7. Putting Biden’s low-key strategy to the test (Vanity Fair).
  8. How Trump killed tens of thousands of Americans (Slate).
  9. Universities must reassert their values (Foreign Affairs).
  10. Donald Trump’s reckless economic gamble (The National Interest).

Categories
Research Program

Friday Links

1. Conducting safe elections during a pandemic (RAND Corporation).

2. The workforce is about to change dramatically (The Atlantic).

3. The real reason BP is getting greener (The New Republic).

4. Searching with the mothers of Mexico’s disappeared (The New Yorker).

5. Is it possible to avert chaos in the vaccine scramble? (CSIS).

6. Fred Kaplan: the decision to bomb Hiroshima wasn’t a decision at all (Slate).

7. Public to private equity (Ritholtz).

8. Pandemic brinkmanship (New Statesman).

9. Republicans don’t make a case for regulating Big Tech (American Enterprise Institute).

10. The tangled history of US-Iran relations (Council on Foreign Relations).

Categories
Research Program

Tuesday Links

  1. How the pandemic defeated America (The Atlantic).
  2. The occult, terrorising politics of QAnon (The New Republic).
  3. Can America weaken the Russia-Iran axis? (RAND Corporation).
  4. The tactics and targets of domestic terrorists (CSIS).
  5. Nursing home networks and COVID-19 (Marginal Revolution).
  6. Trump Says TikTok Must Sell U.S. Arm by Sept. 15, or Close (Bloomberg).
  7. Trump drops opposition to Microsoft bid for TikTok (Financial Times).
  8. What are police like in other countries? (Council on Foreign Relations).
  9. The second act of social media activism (The New Yorker).
  10. Did Mike Pompeo mislead Congress about Syria’s oil? (National Interest).
Categories
Research Program

Ideology and Extremism

The majority of contemporary research on terrorism and extremism has focused on jihadi extremism, while other ideologies have received far less attention. In response to this gap, the current study aims to compare the similarities and differences between jihadi, right-wing and left-wing extremists at the individual level. Using the Profiles of Individual Radicalization in the United States (PIRUS) dataset, a multinomial logistic regression model was used to compare individual-level characteristics across ideologies. Additionally, a two-step cluster analysis was conducted to determine whether these similarities and differences can provide additional insights into differentiating types of extremists generally based on their personal characteristics, regardless of their ideological adherence. The results of the multinomial logistic regression illustrate that there are notable differences across extremist ideologies, but also many similarities. Further exploring ways to better highlight individual-level differences, a cluster analysis revealed five distinct groups of extremists based on their personal characteristics, and demonstrate the utility of a typology of individual characteristics that is empirically derived and validated, and is not dependent on the a priori identification or specification of ideological motivation.

This is the abstract of a new Studies in Conflict and Terrorism article by Sara Doering, Garth Davies, and Raymond Corrado. The use of multinomial logistic regression as a data analysis methodology in this paper is interesting. START’s Profiles of Individual Radicalization in the United States dataset is used in the study.

Categories
Research Program

Wednesday Links

  1. Ignoring the need economy (Slate).
  2. The end of open plan everything (The Atlantic).
  3. How the Simulmatics Corporation invented the future (The New Yorker).
  4. Even Milton Friedman would oppose Trump’s latest Federal Reserve appointment (The New Republic).
  5. When and how will the Putin era end? (RAND Corporation).
  6. COVID-19 reshapes the future (CSIS).
  7. A foreign policy election? (Council on Foreign Relations).
  8. The subtle art of ‘hacking’ UFOs (VICE).
  9. How the Trumps helped a COVID-19 proposal go viral (Vox).
  10. Call Trump’s tactics what they are: fascist (The Nation).
Categories
Research Program

Monday Links

  1. The declining power of the American passport (The Atlantic).
  2. Homeland Security was destined to become a secret police force (The New Yorker).
  3. Can Trump win in November by reviving Willie Horton? (The Nation).
  4. Maureen Dowd interviews Elon Musk (New York Times).
  5. How do you shop for books in a bookstore? (Marginal Revolution).
  6. Mike Pompeo just declared America’s new China policy: regime change (National Interest).
  7. The sly psychology behind magicians’ card tricks (Wired).
  8. Why 2020 is not just another 2016 (New York Magazine).
  9. Money and might (War on the Rocks).
  10. China’s grand strategy (RAND Corporation).

Categories
Research Program

What I’m Reading

  1. Why I Am Not Liberal by Jonathan Bowden (Perth, Australia: Imperium Press, 2020). A transcribed three hour interview from 2009 with the former far right writer, activist and Odinist neopagan, who foreshadowed many of the Alt-Right strategies in 2016.
  2. Marx In Motion: A New Materialist Marx by Thomas Nail (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020). A re-evaluation of Karl Marx drawing on his overlooked PhD dissertation. The book’s introduction clearly explains the different currents of Marxist thought and the post-2008 revival of his metapolitics.
  3. Human Terrain Systems and the Moral Prosecution of Warfare by Dan G. Cox (Didactic Press, 2015). My PhD briefly touched on the HTS debate and the controversial use of military anthropology in Iraq. I’m reading up more on the HTS – this defence situates it in terms of Just War theory.